Monday, September 01, 2014

ARCHIVES 2015 - Call for Session Proposals

With a mandate from the Council and the membership at large to experiment with new ideas, SAA is shaking things up for its 79th Annual Meeting! The most obvious change is the venue itself: We will be meeting at the Cleveland Convention Center rather than in a traditional conference hotel. But changes in the program development process also are in the works. In addition to the current program model, for example, there will be an opportunity to address more time-sensitive topics via pop-up sessions that can be anything from spur-of-the-moment crowds brought together through social media to more deliberate gatherings of likeminded archivists with specific agendas. And to continue the trend begun in 2013, sessions will be shorter, less formal, and more interactive.

Proposal Evaluation

Session proposals are welcome on any aspect of archives management practices—local, national, and international— as well as their intersections with other professions and domains. Proposals will be evaluated on the strength of the 150-word abstract, the diversity of the speakers and their experiences, and the completeness of the proposal. Session proposals should incorporate one or more of the following:
  • Inclusion of diverse or international perspectives and initiatives.
  • Relevance to SAA members and other interested attendees.
  • Interaction and engagement with session participants.
  • Potential impact on archival practice.
There is no theme for ARCHIVES 2015, but an emphasis will be placed on sessions that reflect on the current state of the archival profession. Proposals related to archival advocacy will be given added consideration, as will sessions that explore new ways to grow the profession.

Session Formats

The Program Committee encourages submission of proposals that may include, but are not limited to, the following formats:
  • Traditional. 75- or 60-minute session consisting of two or three fully prepared papers of 15 minutes each and a commentand- discussion period. Please do not propose sessions of more than three presenters. A chair is not required for this format; chair duties may be performed by one of the speakers. Paper titles are required.
  • Incubator Session. 60-minute session consisting of two presentations of 10 minutes each that describe project, research, or collaboration initiatives in their developing or formative stages, and including at least 40 minutes for audience feedback and discussion.
  • Special Focus Session. 60-minute session designed to highlight innovative archives or records management programs, new techniques, and research projects. Audience participation is encouraged.
  • Panel Discussion. 75- or 60-minute session consisting of a panel of 3 to 5 individuals discussing theories or perspectives on a given topic. Similar to the traditional model, the goal of a panel discussion is to have a more informal session with time for audience feedback. Presentation titles are not printed in the program. A moderator is required; a commentator is optional.
  • Poster Presentation. Report in which information is summarized using brief written statements and graphic materials, such as photographs, charts, graphs, and/or diagrams mounted on poster board. Presenters will be assigned a specific time at which they must be with their poster to discuss it with attendees.
  • Lightning Talks. Eight to eleven lively and informative 5-minute talks in a 60-minute Lightning Talk session format. The session chair secures commitments from speakers and compiles all presentation slides to ensure timely speaker transitions. Proposals in this category may suggest recommended presenters, and commitments should be secured soon after the proposal is accepted.
  • Alternative Format. Don’t feel confined by the prescribed formats—suggest an alternative format or create your own! Alternative format sessions may take a variety of forms. Examples include world cafĂ© (http://www.theworldcafe.com/ method.html) and fishbowl discussions (http://en.wikipedia .org/wiki/Fishbowl_(conversation). Or you could go “old school” and propose a debate with opposing views and rebuttals. We welcome your creative ideas about how your topic might best be addressed! Proposals in this category must specify the format and session facilitator and briefly describe how the format will enhance presentation of the material and may suggest up to four presenters who will be involved in the session.

New for 2015: Pop-Ups!

For the first time the Program Committee will set aside one hour on Thursday and Friday afternoons for impromptu interactive meetings. Pop-Up sessions might occur as a result of a lively blog discussion, an idea that came up in an earlier session, or an inspiration at lunch. Or Pop-Ups could be used by sections or roundtables for open discussions on hot topics. Sessions will be advertised on the fly via appropriate social media during the meeting. The use of Pop-Up rooms will be coordinated by the Program Committee at the conference site. However, proposals may also be submitted to the Program Committee prior to the meeting beginning in May 2015. Do not use the Session Proposal Form for Pop-Ups. Stay tuned for additional information on these sessions.
Your format choice will not affect the decision of the Program Committee. The Program Committee may, however, recommend that the proposed format be changed if it believes that a different format may better serve the session’s desired audience.

Reminder for Proposal Submitters and Session Participants

Archivists and records managers who participate in the program (including in Pop-Up sessions) must register and secure institutional or personal funding. Participants who are not archivists or records managers, or who are from outside the United States and Canada, may be eligible for complimentary registration upon request. SAA cannot provide funding for speakers, whether they are international, non-archivists, non–records managers, members, or nonmembers.

Proposals for the 2015 Annual Meeting are due on October 8, 2014.


Thursday, August 28, 2014

News from Barnard and the Seven Siblings

Barnard Library Hosts History of Women's Education Open Access Portal Project Meeting 

Archivists, administrators and programmers from the Seven Siblings (formerly Seven Sisters) met at Barnard College on 7/25/2014 to discuss the collborative "History of Women's Education Open Access Portal Project." Project participants include staff from Barnard, Bryn Mawr, Mt. Holyoke, Radcliffe (Schlesinger Library/Harvard University), Smith, Vassar and Wellesley colleges.


Photograph from Barnard Library and Academic Academic Information Services, Barnard College

Visit the link above for the rest of the article.

Monday, August 25, 2014

From The Examiner:

The National Archives at Kansas City will present in partnership with the American Association of University Women and the League of Women Voters a program titled “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Minor?: Women’s Suffrage on the Prairie” at 6:30 p.m. Aug. 28. A 6 p.m. reception will precede the program.

Friday, August 22, 2014

Baltimore Wikipedia Edit-a-thon

From the Baltimore Brew
Why no mention in Wikipedia of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s years living in Baltimore’s Bolton Hill? 

Why nothing about Esther McCready, the trailblazing East Baltimore nurse who desegregated the University of Maryland School of Nursing? 

And as for the Great Railroad Strike of 1877, isn’t Wikipedia giving short shrift to events in Baltimore when it says the epic unrest began solely in Martinsburg, West Virginia? 

At a Baltimore Wikipedia Edit-a-thon scheduled this Saturday at Red Emma’s, anyone with an interest in correcting errors and omissions in Baltimore’s online history can join like-minded types to do so.

Read more. . .

Tuesday, August 05, 2014

Our Annual Meeting at SAA

Meeting Date(s): 
August 13, 2014,  5:15pm - 7:15pm 
Marriott Wardman Park, Virginia B 
Washington, DC

Join us for the WCRT annual business meeting to discuss activities, issues, and concerns related to women’s collections. As announced previously, our special guest will be Heather Slania from the National Museum of Women in the Arts. Here is a description of Heather's talk:

Online Art Ephemera: Web Archiving at the National Museum of Women in the Arts and Beyond

Artist archives usually contain important primary source materials such as brochures, catalogues, checklists, artist statements, and dairies—but what happens when this ephemera is only online? The National Museum of Women in the Arts has been web archiving art-related online ephemera using the Internet Archive's Archive-It since November 2011. Heather Slania will present the considerations and challenges of archiving this material as well as discuss how arts institutions are beginning to work together for more collaborative web archiving. This will be discussed in the context of the collection development plan of the library’s archives; questions related to our traditional archival collections are also welcome.

In addition, we are trying to organize an informal dinner outing immediately following the meeting, tentatively at the nearby Lebanese Taverna.

If you're interested in joining us for dinner, use the handy meetup spreadsheet SNAP kindly has made available. You can only add a certain number of attendees to each row, so please start another row if you find it already full. If we have enough responses by Friday, we can go ahead and try to make a dinner reservation.

Thursday, July 31, 2014

June 11-14, 2015
College of Charleston, Charleston, South Carolina
Re-membering/Gendering: Women, Historical Tourism, and Public History

The Southern Association for Women Historians (SAWH) invites proposals for its tenth triennial conference, to be held June 11-14, 2015 at the College of Charleston in Charleston, South Carolina. Co-sponsored by the College of Charleston, The Citadel, and Clemson University, the conference provides a stimulating and congenial forum for discussing all aspects of women’s history. Its program seeks to reflect the best in recent scholarship and the diversity of our profession, including university professors, graduate students, museum curators, public historians, and independent scholars.

We invite sessions on all aspects of women’s and gender history and particularly welcome presentations that explore the conference themes: public history, tourism, memory, historic commemoration, and marketing history.

The program committee seeks proposals for the following:
  1. Panels: we prefer to receive proposals for complete, 3-paper sessions but will consider individual papers as well.
    Panel: pdf formword form.   Individual: pdf formword form.
  2. Roundtables: informal discussions of a historical or professional issue.
    Form: pdf formword form.
  3. Working Group Discussions: informal discussions of pre-circulated papers.
    Form: pdf formword form.
  4. Scholarly Shorts: five-minute presentations of a research project.
    Form: pdf formword form.
Scholars interested in chairing or commenting on a session are invited to submit a 500-word vita.
More information on these presentation formats, submission guidelines, and the submission email address is available from the main conference page.

The submissions deadline is August 1, 2014. 

Inquiries (but not submissions) may be directed to Blain Roberts, program committee chair, at broberts@csufresno.edu.

Monday, July 28, 2014

Links of Interest

Start your week off with some interesting stories from around the world. Enjoy!

 "The amazing story of a 4,000-year-old necklace found in a dumpster" from Newsnextbd.com.
"A 4,000 year old necklace and two discs are now in The National Museum of Ireland after they were found in a dumpster. The necklace, called a lunala, was worn by the early kings of Ireland. It is thought to date from between 2,300 and 1,800 BC."

"Big Berkshire Conference 2014 Report" by Heather Munro Prescott on NursingClio.org.
"Last month, I attended the 16th Berkshire Conference on the History of Women (aka the Big Berks) at the University of Toronto. For those unfamiliar with this event, it is a triennial research conference held by the Berkshire Conference of Women Historians (aka the Little Berks)."

"The Girl with a Pearl Earring: The Making of an Icon"
, a lecture by Arthur K. Wheelock Jr., curator of northern baroque paintings, National Gallery of Art (audio only)
"At the end of the 19th century, Johannes Vermeer’s Girl with a Pearl Earring sold for a pittance, an unknown work by an artist who was only beginning to achieve recognition. Today it is revered as a great masterpiece, so famous that it is recognizable by its title alone, with the name of its maker being almost superfluous. In this lecture recorded on June 1, 2014, at the National Gallery of Art, curator Arthur Wheelock examines the reasons why this image resonates so profoundly with contemporary audiences."

"Crusty 118-year-old sandwich found stuffed in UK church organ" from Mid-Day.com
"The perfectly preserved remains of a sandwich have been discovered in the bowels of a church organ —more than a century after they were put there."

"Anna Yegorova’s Red Sky" at ozy.com
"Being a World War II fighter pilot wasn’t all glamor and bravado as Hollywood suggests. It meant coaxing a temperamental machine into the air, dodging lethal bits of metal at high speeds and testing one’s physical limits and mental resolve. And for Anna Yegorova, one of the few women to fly alongside the men in World War II, that was just the beginning."